Tag Archives: activist

SoR in Interface: feminism, women’s movements and women in movement

14 Dec

Sisters of Resistance are delighted to appear in the latest edition of Interface. Our discussion with Dr Sara Motta, about resistance to patriarchy, the SoR blog and practicing feminism in the everyday, is available for download as an audio file here.

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Volume three, issue two (November 2011):

Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement

Full PDF is available here

Issue editors: Sara Motta, Cristina Flesher Fominaya, Catherine Eschle, Laurence Cox

Volume three, issue two of Interface, a peer-reviewed e-journal produced and refereed by social movement practitioners and engaged movement researchers, is now out, on the special theme “Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement”. Interface is open-access (free), global and multilingual. Our overall aim is to “learn from each other’s struggles”: to develop a dialogue between practitioners and researchers, but also between different social movements, intellectual traditions and national or regional contexts.

This issue of Interface includes 27 pieces in English and Spanish, by authors writing from / about Australia, Canada, Denmark, Guatemala, India, Ireland, Mexico, Nicaragua, the Netherlands, Poland, South Africa, Spain, the UK and the US.

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Women We Admire: Wangari Maathai (1940-2011)

16 Oct
Wangari Maathai

Africa's Green Queen

WHO SHE IS: Wangari Maathai (1 April 1940 – 25 September 2011), Kenyan feminist, environmental and political activist.

WHAT SHE HAS ACCOMPLISHED: In the 1970s, she founded the Green Belt Movement, an environmental organization that empowers women by planting trees to restore their environments. She was one of the first to pioneer this practice among  grassroots campaigns for environmental conservation.  According to The Guardian, “Her disdain for the economics promoted by Britain, the World Bank, and the west was huge: ‘The people at the top of the pyramid do not understand the limits to growth and they do not appreciate that they jeopardize the capacity of future generations to meet their own needs,’ she said.

Her solution, to work with the poorest and most vulnerable women to repair their own degraded environments and empower themselves, proved inspirational. Planting trees became a worldwide symbol of hope and community regeneration. The Green Belt Movement she started evolved into one of the first truly worldwide, grassroots, self-help organisations.” (John Vidal, Guardian, 27 Sept. 2011)

Women of the Green Belt Movement planting trees

Over the next 20 years, tens of billions of trees were planted by women as a direct result of her work. For this, she became the first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize (2004) for “her contribution to sustainable development, democracy and peace.”  She is known as one of Kenya’s greatest heroes of the last 50 years.

WHY WE LOVE HER: Mathaai’s politics was on point and her principles were put into practice. She combined environmentalism and feminism; she built an ecofeminist movement that went worldwide, united female poverty and environmental concerns to fight against patriarchy and for climate justice.  She was fearless, responding to extreme political repression with public acts of resistance, such as home barricades, hunger strikes and clashes with the police. Through it all, she wore traditional dress, repping for her culture. She remained defiant in her personal life as well, refusing to allow her husband to control her. Her passion, her example,  and the grassroots model she used will continue to inspire women as we fight for revolutionary change.

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The Women of #OccupyWallSt

28 Sep

Viva las mujeres de la revolution.

Venceremos!

Cross-Post: The demand is a process #OccupyWallSt #Sept17

24 Sep

Statement on Intimate Partner Violence by KIA

24 Jul

Sisters of Resistance are actively involved in groups working to combat patriarchy, one of which is currently in the process of developing a statement addressing intimate partner violence in the local activist community.

To create our statement, we drew upon the advice of Seattle activist group KIA (Khmer in Action), who, inspired by our sista Robin Suhyung Park’s Open Letter to Community Organisers and Activists released earlier this year, produced the below statement documenting troubling accounts of abuse and harassment but also offering excellent advice for communities working to address this serious and widespread issue.

Spread knowledge. Spread love.

TRIGGER WARNING – The letter documents experiences of intimate partner violence, abuse and harassment and may be triggering.

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